Croc’s Life, Not Easy

One would be forgiven for believing that a four-metre Crocodile would have few cares in the world, but a Croc’s life is not easy.

DSC_2028

With a very low metabolic rate and therefore low energy requirements, a single meal will sustain a Crocodile for many months.

They tear throat-sized chunks off their prey and swallow this whole. Passing through a muscular gizzard, these pieces are quickly broken down before they reach the acid stomach. A further reduction takes place here, before these smaller chunks pass into an elongated intestine, where slow digestion takes place. In addition to this, Crocodiles are endothermic, meaning that they do not use food to produce the energy needed to regulate their body’s temperature. They do this externally, by lazing on sandbanks soaking up the Sun or drifting in the water cooling down.

But there is a downside to this indolence: Crocodiles do not have vast energy stores and exhaust themselves fairly quickly.

DSC_2030

So when this Crocodile managed to snatch a bite to eat from the heaving, co-operative mass tearing a Puku apart, it chose a sandbank away from the madding crowd, opposite Shenton Safaris’ Hippo Hide. Earlier in the year we showed just how frenzied it can become around a carcass, in Luangwa River’s Sanitation Department and this is why this fellow chose a seemingly quiet spot.

IMG_0795-2

H1480007-2

Unfortunately for the Crocodile, Hippos are innately curious about the goings on in their river.

DSC_2034

DSC_2044

DSC_2045

And being gregarious, they like to share the objects of their curiosity with their fellows; or is it merely a case of safety in numbers?

DSC_2052

Feeling crowded for space, the Crocodile edged away from the intruding Hippos,

DSC_2053

DSC_2055

DSC_2068

but the Hippos were not allowing it any space.

DSC_2074

And so it reacted with speed, dodging between the three, it dived into the water and solitude . . .

DSC_2076

DSC_2077

DSC_2078

DSC_2079

DSC_2080

DSC_2081

or so it thought at the time.

DSC_2098

Photographs by Patrick Njobvu for Shenton Safaris.

Shenton Safaris

About Shenton Safaris

Shenton Safaris has written 179 post in this blog.

Leave A Comment

css.php
This website uses cookies to optimise your online user experience. By continuing to use our site you agree to us using cookies in accordance with our Cookie Policy. Ok, Got it